Press "Enter" to skip to content

Ultimate SEO World

Fun SEO Role Play Game

Alexis Sanders from Merkle put together a really fun, educational and addictive SEO RPG, role playing game. It is available at technicalseo.guru and you can play it for free.

Daily Search Forum Recap: December 13, 2019

Here is a recap of what happened in the search forums today, through the eyes of the Search Engine Roundtable and other search forums on the web...

Spectator to Partner: Turn Your Clients into SEO Allies – Best of Whiteboard Friday

Posted by KameronJenkins

Are your clients your allies in SEO, or are they passive spectators? Could they even be inadvertently working against you? A better understanding of expectations, goals, and strategy by everyone involved can improve your client relations, provide extra clarity, and reduce the number of times you're asked to "just SEO a site." 

In today's Whiteboard Friday, Kameron Jenkins outlines tactics you should know for getting clients and bosses excited about the SEO journey, as well as the risks involved in passivity.

(We were inspired to revisit this classic Whiteboard Friday by our brand-new Mini Guide to SEO Reporting! These two resources go together like a fine La Croix and a well-aged cheese.)

Hop to the Mini Guide

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hey, everyone, and welcome to this week's edition of Whiteboard Friday. I am Kameron Jenkins, and I'm the SEO Wordsmith here at Moz. Today I'm going to be talking with you about how to turn your clients from spectators, passive spectators to someone who is proactively interested and an ally in your SEO journey.

So if you've ever heard someone come to you, maybe it's a client or maybe you're in-house and this is your boss saying this, and they say, "Just SEO my site," then this is definitely for you. A lot of times it can be really hard as an SEO to work on a site if you really aren't familiar with the business, what that client is doing, what they're all about, what their goals are. So I'm going to share with you some tactics for getting your clients and your boss excited about SEO and excited about the work that you're doing and some risks that can happen when you don't do that.

Tactics

So let's dive right in. All right, first we're going to talk about tactics.

1. Share news

The first tactic is to share news. In the SEO industry, things are changing all the time, so it's actually a really great tactic to keep yourself informed, but also to share that news with the client. So here's an example. Google My Business is now experimenting with a new video format for their post feature. So one thing that you can do is say, "Hey, client, I hear that Google is experimenting with this new format. They're using videos now. Would you like to try it?"

So that's really cool because it shows them that you're on top of things. It shows them that you're the expert and you're keeping your finger on the pulse of the industry. It also tells them that they're going to be a part of this new, cutting-edge technology, and that can get them really, really excited about the SEO work you're doing. So make sure to share news. I think that can be really, really valuable.

2. Outline your work

The next tip is to outline your work. This one seems really simple, but there is so much to say for telling a client what you're going to do, doing it, and then telling them that you did it. It's amazing what can happen when you just communicate with a client more. There have been plenty of situations where maybe I did less tangible work for a client one week, but because I talk to them more, they were more inclined to be happy with me and excited about the work I was doing.

It's also cool because when you tell a client ahead of time what you're going to do, it gives them time to get excited about, "Ooh, I can't wait to see what he or she is going to do next." So that's a really good tip for getting your clients excited about SEO.

3. Report results

Another thing is to report on your results. So, as SEOs, it can be really easy to say, hey, I added this page or I fixed these things or I updated this.

But if we detach it from the actual results, it doesn't really matter how much a client likes you or how much your boss likes you, there's always a risk that they could pull the plug on SEO because they just don't see the value that's coming from it. So that's an unfortunate reality, but there are tons of ways that you can show the value of SEO. One example is, "Hey, client, remember that page that we identified that was ranking on page two. We improved it. We made all of those updates we talked about, and now it's ranking on page one. So that's really exciting. We're seeing a lot of new traffic come from it.I'm wondering, are you seeing new calls, new leads, an uptick in any of those things as a result of that?"

So that's really good because it shows them what you did, the results from that, and then it kind of connects it to, "Hey, are you seeing any revenue, are you seeing new clients, new customers," things like that. So they're more inclined to see that what you're doing is making a real, tangible impact on actual revenue and their actual business goals.

4. Acknowledge and guide their ideas

This one is really, really important. It can be hard sometimes to marry best practices and customer service. So what I mean by that is there's one end of the pendulum where you are really focused on best practices. This is right. This is wrong. I know my SEO stuff. So when a client comes to you and they say, "Hey, can we try this?" and you go, "No, that's not best practices,"it can kind of shut them down. It doesn't get them involved in the SEO process. In fact, it just kind of makes them recoil and maybe they don't want to talk to you, and that's the exact opposite of what we want here. On the other end of that spectrum though, you have clients who say, "Hey, I really want to try this.I saw this article. I'm interested in this thing. Can you do it for my website?"

Maybe it's not the greatest idea SEO-wise. You're the SEO expert, and you see that and you go, "Mm, that's actually kind of scary. I don't think I want to do that." But because you're so focused on pleasing your client, you maybe do it anyway. So that's the opposite of what we want as well. We want to have a "no, but" mentality. So an example of that could be your client emails in and says, "Hey, I want to try this new thing."

You go, "Hey, I really like where your head is at. I like that you're thinking about things this way. I'm so glad you shared this with me. I tried this related thing before, and I think that would be actually a really good idea to employ on your website." So kind of shifting the conversation, but still bringing them along with you for that journey and guiding them to the correct conclusions. So that's another way to get them invested without shying them away from the SEO process.

Risks

So now that we've talked about those tactics, we're going to move on to the risks. These are things that could happen if you don't get your clients excited and invested in the SEO journey.

1. SEO becomes a checklist

When you don't know your client well enough to know what they're doing in the real world, what they're all about, the risk becomes you have to kind of just do site health stuff, so fiddling with meta tags, maybe you're changing some paragraphs around, maybe you're changing H1s, fixing 404s, things like that, things that are just objectively, "I can make this change, and I know it's good for site health."

But it's not proactive. It's not actually doing any SEO strategies. It's just cleanup work. If you just focus on cleanup work, that's really not an SEO strategy. That's just making sure your site isn't broken. As we all know, you need so much more than that to make sure that your client's site is ranking. So that's a risk.

If you don't know your clients, if they're not talking to you, or they're not excited about SEO, then really all you're left to do is fiddle with kind of technical stuff. As good as that can be to do, our jobs are way more fun than that. So communicate with your clients. Get them on board so that you can do proactive stuff and not just fiddling with little stuff.

2. SEO conflicts with business goals

So another risk is that SEO can conflict with business goals.

So say that you're an SEO. Your client is not talking to you. They're not really excited about stuff that you're doing. But you decide to move forward with proactive strategies anyway. So say I'm an SEO, and I identify this keyword. My client has this keyword. This is a related keyword. It can bring in a lot of good traffic. I've identified this good opportunity. All of the pages that are ranking on page one, they're not even that good. I could totally do better. So I'm going to proactively go, I'm going to build this page of content and put it on my client's site. Then what happens when they see that page of content and they go, "We don't even do that. We don't offer that product. We don't offer that service."

Oops. So that's really bad. What can happen is that, yes, you're being proactive, and that's great. But if you don't actually know what your client is doing, because they're not communicating with you, they're not really excited, you risk misaligning with their business goals and misrepresenting them. So that's a definite risk.

3. You miss out on PR opportunities

Another thing, you miss out on PR opportunities. So again, if your client is not talking to you, they're not excited enough to share what they're doing in the real world with you, you miss out on news like, "Hey, we're sponsoring this event,"or, "Hey, I was the featured expert on last night's news."

Those are all really, really good things that SEOs look for. We crave that information. We can totally use that to capitalize on it for SEO value. If we're not getting that from our clients, then we miss out on all those really, really cool PR opportunities. So a definite risk. We want those PR opportunities. We want to be able to use them.

4. Client controls the conversation

Next up, client controls the conversation. That's a definite risk that can happen. So if a client is not talking to you, a reason could be they don't really trust you yet. When they don't trust you, they tend to start to dictate. So maybe our client emails in.

A good example of this is, "Hey, add these 10 backlinks to my website." Or, "Hey, I need these five pages, and I need them now." Maybe they're not even actually bad suggestions. It's just the fact that the client is asking you to do that. So this is kind of tricky, because you want to communicate with your client. It's good that they're emailing in, but they're the ones at that point that are dictating the strategy. Whereas they should be communicating their vision, so hey, as a business owner, as a website owner, "This is my vision. This is my goal, and this is what I want."

As the SEO professional, you're receiving that information and taking it and making it into an SEO strategy that can actually be really, really beneficial for the client. So there's a huge difference between just being a task monkey and kind of transforming their vision into an SEO strategy that can really, really work for them. So that's a definite risk that can happen.

Excitement + partnership = better SEO campaigns

There's a lot of different things that can happen. These are just some examples of tactics that you can use and risks. If you have any examples of things that have worked for you in the past, I would love to hear about them. It's really good to information share. Success stories where maybe you got your client or your boss really bought into SEO, more so than just, "Hey, I'm spending money on it."

But, "Hey, I'm your partner in this. I'm your ally, and I'm going to give you all the information because I know that it's going to be mutually beneficial for us." So at the end here, excitement, partner, better SEO campaigns. This is going to be I believe a recipe for success to get your clients and your boss on board. Thanks again so much for watching this edition of Whiteboard Friday, and come back next week for another one.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

Google Tests Review Carousel In Local Knowledge Panel

Mike Blumenthal posted on Twitter a screen shot of a new look for reviews listed in the local knowledge panel. It shows a carousel of reviews, and Mike said are "query related phrases."

‘Tis the Season for Reporting (And a New Mini Guide)

Posted by Roger-MozBot

How is it already reporting season again? Time to generate those dreaded end-of-year SEO reports that take hours to create and mere seconds for your client to skim through and toss to the side. We’ve all been there. But here's the thing: it’s absolutely necessary! Not only for you and your team to track progress, but to prove value to your clients as well.

Reporting for SEO can feel like a time-black-hole. You have an infinite amount of data that you have to sort through and piece together to tell a story. You know that you saw something, somewhere at some point that proved a strategy worked, but of course, now that you need it you can’t find it and now you’ve been looking for it for an hour and you just want to get back to the SEO part of your job.

What if we told you we could help you create reports that matter to your team and your clients in less time with better output? Today we launched our newest brainchild, the Mini Guide to SEO Reporting, our free guide to help you create the most effective SEO reports for your business.

Give it a read!

Okay, so maybe it's not the MOST mini mini-guide that ever did mini. But in comparison to the Beginner's Guide to SEO, it's definitely a munchkin! We like to think it's chock full of easy-to-read chapters and plenty of actionable-insights, a few of which we’d like to share with you now.

1. More data, more problems

The idea for the mini guide was born after we noticed a trend in SEO reporting — they're often cobbled together and extremely time intensive. Many SEOs rely on multiple platforms to gather all of the data needed to make recommendations and track progress. So, when they want to report back to their clients, they have to go to all of the different platforms to collect the necessary data. This makes everything ten times more complicated because many of the platforms use differing jargon and have different data exporting processes, and when it comes time to piece it all together, it’s extremely difficult to maintain a consistent tone or a clear story to follow.

That leads us right into the first actionable insight: your reports need to be KonMaried. Well, kind of. In reporting, you can’t quite ask if a data point brings you joy, but you can ask if a data point is meaningful. You need to ask yourself, your team, and most importantly your client which data points are meaningful to your SEO campaign. Once you nail down the must-haves, stick to them! You can always reassess later, but filling up your report with irrelevant data makes it less appealing to the client and easier for them to gloss over. Plus, narrowing down some of the data you have to report on will allow you to spend more time on SEO and less time on reporting.

To get the conversation started with your client, we created a downloadable one sheet with thirty must-ask questions about reporting.

2. The TL;DR report

We know that most people who get their hands on our reports don’t read them front to back, but we want to make sure that they get all of the important insights — that’s where the TLDR, or wins/losses, report comes in.

In the mini guide, we recommend an “at-a-glance” type report that is simply a bullet list of insights like:

  • What goals were met
  • What goals weren’t meant
  • Any discrepancies that need to be considered while reading the rest of the report
  • One-sentence explanations of the most important findings for the reporting period

This easy to read format will ensure that all of the information you need to get across, gets across. You can think of this section as a summary or a table of contents. The rest of the report will simply go over the data that backs the claims you make in the TLDR report.

A very important note to be made here is that there will be losses, and you need to be upfront about that with your clients. Don’t fudge the data because that will set you up for an inevitable break in your relationship with the client (maybe bring fudge with the data instead — a client with chocolate is a happy client). It's much better to be transparent about the strategies that are simply not working or the goals that aren’t being met.

Likewise, if you are having trouble with setting or achieving goals, we also go through a step-by-step process on goal setting for clients. It takes into account everything from the client’s SWOT and competitive analyses to what it means to create a SMART goal.

3. Simplify the complex

Keeping things easy-breezy when reporting is especially tough when it comes to technical SEO. Though technical SEO is extremely important, it can seem rather bland to clients (especially when they are not up to scuff on the terminology). In the mini guide, we go through some of the ways you can simplify and improve the reporting you do on technical SEO.

First things first: you need to make sure your clients know what you're talking about, so use their language! It may be slightly different for each client, but having this foundation set is critical for keeping clients engaged and eager about the improvements you are making.

Once the foundation is set, we suggest covering what you’ve done and what you’re planning on doing in context of their respective impacts. When listing these action items, be sure to explain the benefits that can be expected. Just because someone understands what a meta description is doesn’t mean they’re going to understand than an optimized meta description can increase click-through rates. Some of the things you do in a reporting period may be expected or something you’re checking off of a list, but other things may be the result of running into an unforeseen issue — be sure to address both! This helps to establish trust and show your client that you're staying on top of their SEO, even if they aren’t 100% sure what to expect.

Give it a read

That’s it, no more spoilers. To get the rest of the juicy details you're going to have to read it for yourself!

See how mini this guide really is

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

Google News Publisher Center Updated & News Content Now From Web

Google announced yesterday a revamp of the Google Publisher Center, which originally launched in 2014. This revamp merges two existing tools, Google News Producer and Google News Publisher Center, into one. In addition, Google said "Content for News will now come directly from the web, just as it does for Search."

Launching a new Publisher Center

Today we are announcing the launch of Publisher Center to help publishers more easily manage how their content appears across Google products. Publisher Center merges two existing tools, Google News Producer and Google News Publisher Center, improving their user experience and functionality. Publisher Center’s new features include a simpler way…

Becoming an Industry Thought Leader: Advanced Techniques for Finding the Best Places to Pitch Guest Posts

Posted by KristinTynski

If you’re involved in any kind of digital PR — or pitching content to writers to expand your brand awareness and build strong links — then you know how hard it can be to find a good home for your content.

I’m about to share the process you can use to identify the best, highest ROI publishers for building consistent, mutually beneficial guest posting relationships with.

This knowledge has been invaluable in understanding which publications have the best reach and authority to other known vertical/niche experts, allowing you to share your own authority within these readership communities.

Before we get started, there’s a caveat: If you aren’t willing to develop true thought leadership, this process won’t work for you. The prerequisite for success here is having a piece of content that is new, newsworthy, and most likely data-driven.

Now let’s get to the good stuff.

Not all publications are equal

Guest posting can increase awareness of your brand, create link authority, and ultimately generate qualified leads. However, that only happens if you pick publishers that have:

  • The trust of your target audience.
  • Topical relevance and authority.
  • Sufficiently large penetration in readership amongst existing authorities in your niche/vertical.

A big trap many fall into is not properly prioritizing their guest posting strategy along these three important metrics.

To put this strategy into context, I’ll provide a detailed methodology for understanding the “thought leadership” space of two different verticals. I’ll also include actionable tips for developing a prioritized list of targets for winning guest spots or columns with your killer content.

It all starts with BuzzSumo

We use BuzzSumo data as the starting point for developing these interactive elements. For this piece, the focus will be on looking at data pulled from their Influencer and Shared Links APIs.

Let’s begin by looking at the data we’re after in the regular user interface. On the Influencers tab, we start by selecting a keyword most representative of the overall niche/industry/vertical we want to understand. We’ll start with “SEO.”

The list of influencers here should already be sorted, but feel free to narrow it down by applying filters. I recommend making sure your final list has 250-500 influencers as a minimum to be comprehensive.

Next, and most importantly, we want to get the links’ shared data for each of these influencers. This will be the data we use to build our network visualizations to truly understand the publishers in the space that are likely to be the highest ROI places for guest posting.

Below you can see the visual readout for one influencer.

Note the distribution of websites Gianluca Fiorelli (@gfiorelli1) most often links to on Twitter. These sites (and their percentages) will be the data we use for our visualization.

Pulling our data programmatically

Thankfully, BuzzSumo has an excellent and intuitive API, so it’s relatively easy to pull and aggregate all of the data we need. I’ve included a link to my script in Github for those who would like to do it themselves.

In general, it does the following:

  • Generates the first page of influencers for the given keyword, which is about 50. You can either update the script to iterate through pages or just update the page number it pulls from within the script and concatenate the output files after the fact.
  • For each influencer, it makes another API call and gets all of the aggregated Top Domains shared data for each influencer, which is the same as the data you see in the above pie chart visualization.
  • Aggregates all the data and exports to a CSV.

Learning from the data

Once we have our data in the format Gephi prefers for network visualizations (sample edge file), we are ready to start exploring. Let’s start with our data from the “SEO” search, for which I pulled the domain sharing data for the top 400 influencers.

A few notes:

  • The circles are called nodes. All black nodes are the influencer’s Twitter accounts. All other colored nodes are the websites.
  • The size of the nodes is based on Page Rank. This isn’t the Google Page Rank number, but instead the Page Rank within this graph alone. The larger the node, the more authoritative (and popular) that website is within the entire graph.
  • The colors of the nodes are based on a modularity algorithm in Gephi. Nodes with similar link graphs typically have the same color.

What can we learn from the SEO influencer graph?

Well, the graph is relatively evenly distributed and cohesive. This indicates that the websites and blogs that are shared most frequently are well known by the entire community.

Additionally, there are a few examples of clusters outside the primary cluster (the middle of the graph). For instance, we see a Local SEO cluster at the 10 p.m. position on the left hand side. We can also see a National Press cluster at the 6-7 p.m. position on the bottom and a French Language cluster at the 1-2 p.m. position at the top right.

Ultimately, Moz, Search Engine Journal, Search Engine Roundtable, Search Engine Land are great bets when developing and fostering guest posting relationships.

Note that part of the complication with this data has to do with publishing volume. The three largest nodes are also some of the most prolific, meaning there are more overall chances for articles to earn Tweets and other social media mentions from industry influencers. You could refining of the data further by normalizing each site by content publishing volume to find publishers who publish much less frequently and still enjoy disproportionate visibility within the industry.

Webmasters.Googleblog.com is a good example of this. They publish 3 to 4 times per month, and yet because of their influence in the industry, they’re still one of the largest and most central nodes. Of course, this makes sense given it is the only public voice of Google for our industry.

Another important thing to notice is the prominence of both YouTube and SlideShare. If you haven’t yet realized the importance and reach of these platforms, perhaps this is the proof you need. Video content and slide decks are highly shared in the SEO community by top influencers.

Differences between SEO and content marketing influencer graphs

What can we learn from the Content Marketing influencer graph?

For starters, it looks somewhat different overall from the SEO influencer graph; it’s much less cohesive and seems to have many more separate clusters. This could indicate that the content publishing sphere for content marketing is perhaps less mature, with more fragmentation and fewer central sources for consuming content marketing related content. It could also be that content marketing is descriptive of more than SEO and that different clusters are publishers that focus more on one type of content marketing vs. another (similar to what we saw with the local SEO cluster in the previous example).

Instead of 3 to 5 similarly sized market leaders, here we see one behemoth, Content Marketing Institute, a testament to both the authority of that brand and the massive amount of content they publish.

We can also see several specific clusters. For instance, the “SEO blogs” cluster in blue at the 8-9 p.m. position and the more general marketing blogs like Hubspot, MarketingProfs, and Social Media Examiner in green and mauve at the 4-5 p.m. position.

The general business top-tier press sites appear quite influential in this space as well, including Forbes, Entrepreneur, Adweek, Tech Crunch, Business Insider, Inc., which we didn’t see as much in the SEO example.

YouTube, again, is extremely important, even more so than in the SEO example.

Is it worth it?

If you’re already deep in an industry, the visualization results of this process are unlikely to shock you. As someone who’s been in the SEO/content marketing industry for 10 years, the graphs are roughly what I expected, but there certainly were some surprises.

This process will be most valuable to you when you are new to an industry or are working within a new vertical or niche. Using the python code I linked and BuzzSumo’s fantastic API and data offers the opportunity to gain a deep visual understanding of the favorite places of industry thought leaders. This knowledge acts as a basis for strategic planning toward identifying top publishers with your own guest content.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

Blizzard SEO Test Piece

Guest Blog Test Post

 (312) 736-2003  [email protected]  Chicago, IL 60657
blizzardseo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blog

RSS Ultimate SEO Blog
  • Cloud Computing: Digital Ocean vs Google Cloud vs AWS November 7, 2019
    Visit Cloud Computing: Digital Ocean vs Google Cloud vs AWS for the whole story This may seem off topic but its on topic, technical SEO is imperative … you’re not going to rank number one on Google using Shopify or Wix.  It just isnt going to happen. Its also apparently difficult to get solid advice […]
  • Louisville SEO: More Than Keywords – Local SEO November 1, 2019
    Visit Louisville SEO: More Than Keywords – Local SEO for the whole story Louisville Local SEO Expert The post Louisville SEO: More Than Keywords – Local SEO appeared first on Ultimate SEO | Backlinks, Audits & More.
  • Ranking Keywords That People Search October 29, 2019
    Visit Ranking Keywords That People Search for the whole story Branded And Unbranded Keywords: Not Equal SEO Value This is a short discussion on keywords.  If you have read previous articles here you already know that I consider On Page SEO one of the least important factors in ranking yet one of the most obsessed […]
  • Adult SEO Tips October 24, 2019
    Visit Adult SEO Tips for the whole story Originally A Guest Post at Stream SEO Make $1,000 per month with sexy Adult Blogs in 2019 Updated on SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 by SERVANDO SILVA Intro (Servando): This is a guest post by Andrew. While we usually don’t cover anything adult related at Stream SEO, I can’t deny a lot of […]
  • How To Setup Digital Ocean Account – Client Video October 22, 2019
    Visit How To Setup Digital Ocean Account – Client Video for the whole story Want a $50 credit towards Digital Ocean? Digital Ocean $50 Credit For New Accounts Disclosure: Using this link provides Ultimate SEO a $25 credit towards our Digital Ocean bill. × Dismiss alert Setting Up Digital Ocean Account You as a client […]
  • PBN, GuestPost or Syndication for Backlink Building October 4, 2019
    Visit PBN, GuestPost or Syndication for Backlink Building for the whole story Backlink Building We can spend all day optimizing our pages for keywords that we researched for days and never rank content on Google Search.  Its just the cold hard fact that in SEO onpage optimization is the easiest thing and it used to […]
  • New Google Backlink Types And SEO Value Of NoFollow Links Changes September 21, 2019
    Visit New Google Backlink Types And SEO Value Of NoFollow Links Changes for the whole story Two things are important for you to take away from this post about backlinks and they are listed right below.  We’ve then included Google content explaining these two changes in backlinks.  If the text is italic and navy blue, […]
  • Sex, Speed And The SEO Migration of Romantic Depot to WordPress September 14, 2019
    Visit Sex, Speed And The SEO Migration of Romantic Depot to WordPress for the whole story Romantic Depot operates six, soon to be seven adult stores offering sex toys and lingerie, in the New York City area.  Their flagship stores are in Manhattan and the Bronx.  They’ve been around for sometime and over the years their website aged along with other […]
  • Managing And Maintaining A PBN September 8, 2019
    Visit Managing And Maintaining A PBN for the whole story PBNs in 2019 can be just as effective as they once were if properly maintained and staged.  Mimicing an organic site goes a long way in the stability of your PBN. Additional Private Blog Network Resources: SEO PBN – Collection of all our SEO Articles […]
  • Adobe Flash Ends A Decade Late September 5, 2019
    Visit Adobe Flash Ends A Decade Late for the whole story Adobe Will No Longer Support Flash After 2020, 10 Years After Steve Jobs Argued Why It Should End In 2010. Google Announced in September 2019 that it was phasing out support for Flash from its Chrome browser following Adobe;s announcement that they would end […]

Edit

Categories

   Select Category  301  (1)  Account Access  (1)  Adult SEO  (1)  Analytics  (1)  Anchor Text  (4)  Apple  (1)  Audits  (3)  Aws  (1)  AWS vs Digital Ocean  (1)  Backlinks  (6)  branded keywords  (1)  Case Studies  (3)  Client Sites  (6)  Cloud  (2)  Cloud Computing  (2)  Cloud502  (1)  Cloudflare And SEO  (1)  Content  (1)  Custom SEO Site Audit  (1)  Cyber Security  (1)  CyberSEO  (1)  Data  (2)  Digital Ocean  (2)  Digital Ocean Team  (1)  Domain  (2)  Domain authority  (1)  Domain rank  (5)  Election 2018  (1)  Expired domains  (1)  Expireddomains.net  (1)  External RSS  (1)  External source  (1)  Featured  (8)  Flash  (1)  General  (5)  Good SEO Practices  (9)  Google  (1)  Google Cloud  (1)  Google cloud platform  (1)  Google Search Console  (2)  Guest Blogs  (1)  Guest posts  (2)  Hosting  (2)  Identity Theft  (1)  Keyword ranking  (4)  Keywords  (1)  Link building  (3)  Loadimpact.com  (1)  Louisville seo  (3)  Manual Action  (1)  Matthew Leffler  (5)  Migration  (3)  Multi-Domain Strategy  (1)  My Opinion  (4)  n  (1)  Neil Patel  (1)  News  (6)  Nofollow  (1)  Offsite  (4)  Onsite  (1)  Organic search  (5)  Page Speed  (1)  Patel  (1)  PBN  (2)  Pbn 2019  (3)  Pbns  (3)  Plugins  (1)  Political SEO  (2)  Press Releases  (1)  Private Blog Networks  (3)  Ranking  (6)  Redirect  (1)  Referring Domains  (2)  Rss  (1)  Search Engine Console  (1)  Security  (3)  SEO  (10)  SEO factor  (2)  Seo guide  (6)  SEO Plugins  (1)  Seo porn  (1)  SEO Security  (1)  SEO Services  (1)  Seo strategy  (7)  SEO Tools  (1)  SEO Trends  (3)  Site Speed  (1)  Sponsored  (1)  Strategy  (8)  Syndicated News  (4)  Tech  (1)  Technical SEO  (8)  Top position  (1)  UGC  (1)  Ultimate SEO  (4)  unbranded keywords  (1)  Uncategorized  (3)  Upwork  (1)  User Behavior  (1)  Video  (1)  Web Design  (3)  Web Development  (5)  Web Technology  (1)  WHM – cPanel  (1)  WordPress  (5)  WP-Cerber  (1)  WPA Auto Links  (1) 

Recent Posts

 

Content Syndication SEO And Duplicate Content Myth

So this is more a test artcle but it'll also hit on these topics in the title. Duplicate Content is everywhere and its fine...Googles been saying that for years now but some SEOs have this myth in their head that its an issue.  If its such an issue then what about The Associated Press?  The AP syndicates content to almost every local newspaper out there.  Their sites arent penalized for blocks and blocks of duplicate content.  While your chewing on that...

 

What is a unique thing you can do with others content?  The way you arrange it.  What if I setup a site that ingested the RSS feeds of all these political campaigns press releases and used it to create a site that had all the press releases for say US House seats.  That could be of value to someone and provides a research resource for after the election when those sites are down.  Theres an example of providing a useful service with mostly duplicate content.  Its unique that the type of content exists there in one place.

 

So now we see duplicate content isnt bad and in that we know that some authors want publicity but theyve never been heard of ... so they need a platform to gain a following.  Some sites charge for "Ghost Blogging" but thats really not being big picture.  There are sites that want relevant content and there are authors after a site.  

 

Welcome to our syndication site.  You can post an article for free here and you can get articles for free here but we ask you use the RSS feeds and put in a good word back to us somewhere. 

 

Now some filler text...

 

Share This Report

     

Latest Performance Report for:

https://ultimateseo.org/da-ds-dr-dt-cf-t/

Mon, Dec 2, 2019 10:51 PM -0800

  Vancouver, Canada

  Chrome (Desktop) 75.0.3770.100, PageSpeed 1.15-gt1.2, YSlow 3.1.8
 

Looks like you're running WordPress

Have a look at our WP optimization tips »

Performance Scores

PageSpeed Score

 (59%)  

YSlow Score

 (71%) 

Page Details

Fully Loaded Time

4.1s 

Total Page Size

1.95MB 

Requests

97 

RECOMMENDATION GRADE TYPE PRIORITY
Serve scaled images
F (0)

 

IMAGES HIGH
Optimize images
F (0)

 

IMAGES HIGH
Combine images using CSS sprites
F (0)

 

IMAGES HIGH
Leverage browser caching
B (80)

 

SERVER HIGH
Minimize redirects
A (92)

 

CONTENT HIGH
Minify JavaScript
A (96)

 

JS HIGH
Specify image dimensions
A (96)

 

IMAGES MEDIUM
Specify a cache validator
A (98)

 

SERVER HIGH
Minify CSS
A (98)

 

CSS HIGH
Minify HTML
A (99)

 

CONTENT LOW
Avoid bad requests
A (100)

 

CONTENT HIGH
Avoid landing page redirects
A (100)

 

SERVER HIGH
Defer parsing of JavaScript
A (100)

 

JS HIGH
Enable compression
A (100)

 

SERVER HIGH
Enable Keep-Alive
A (100)

 

SERVER HIGH
Inline small CSS
A (100)

 

CSS HIGH
Inline small JavaScript
A (100)

 

JS HIGH
Minimize request size
A (100)

 

CONTENT HIGH
Optimize the order of styles and scripts
A (100)

 

CSS/JS HIGH
Put CSS in the document head
A (100)

 

CSS HIGH
Serve resources from a consistent URL
A (100)

 

CONTENT HIGH
Avoid CSS @import
A (100)

 

CSS MEDIUM
Prefer asynchronous resources
A (100)

 

JS MEDIUM
Specify a character set early
A (100)

 

CONTENT MEDIUM
Avoid a character set in the meta tag
A (100)

 

CONTENT LOW
Specify a Vary: Accept-Encoding header
A (100)

 

SERVER LOW

What do my scores mean?

Rules are sorted in order of impact upon score
Optimizing rules at the top of the list can greatly improve your overall score.

Not every recommendation will apply to your page
The recommendations are meant to be generic, best practices; some things will be out of your control (eg. external resources) or may not apply to your page.

Learn more about PageSpeed/YSlow scores and how they affect performance.

Need optimization help?

Read our how to guides and optimization explained articles for additional direction on improving your page 

 

We have some conditions to ensure the site has good content but otherwise we hope this service is useful.

Daily Search Forum Recap: December 6, 2019

Here is a recap of what happened in the search forums today, through the eyes of the Search Engine Roundtable and other search forums on the web...

Google: Not Having A Manual Action Does Not Mean Your Site Is Good

Google's John Mueller said on Twitter "not having a manual action doesn't mean that the website is good overall." Simple but true - there are algorithms that judge the quality of the site and if your site is not ranking well, and you don't have a manual action, that means your site is probably not all that good?

The Local Algorithm: Relevance, Proximity, and Prominence

Posted by MaryBowling

How does Google decide what goes into the local pack? It doesn't have to be a black box — there's logic behind the order. In this week's Whiteboard Friday, renowned local SEO expert Mary Bowling lays out the three factors that drive Google's local algorithm and local rankings in a simple and concise way anyone can understand.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hi, Moz fans. This is Mary Bowling from Ignitor Digital, and today I want to talk to you about the local algorithm. I'd like to make this as simple as possible for people to understand, because I think it's a very confusing thing for a lot of SEOs who don't do this every day.

The local algorithm has always been based on relevance, prominence, and proximity

1. Relevance

For relevance, what the algorithm is asking is, "Does this business do or sell or have the attributes that the searcher is looking for?" That's pretty simple. So that gives us all these businesses over here that might be relevant. For prominence, the algorithm is asking, "Which businesses are the most popular and the most well regarded in their local market area?"

2. Proximity

For proximity, the question really is, "Is the business close enough to the searcher to be considered to be a good answer for this query?" This is what trips people up. This is what really defines the local algorithm — proximity. So I'm going to try to explain that in very simple terms here today.

Let's say we have a searcher in a particular location, and she's really hungry today and she wants some egg rolls. So her query is egg rolls. If she were to ask for egg rolls near me, these businesses are the ones that the algorithm would favor.

3. Prominence

They are the closest to her, and Google would rank them most likely by their prominence. If she were to ask for something in a particular place, let's say this is a downtown area and she asked for egg rolls downtown because she didn't want to be away from work too long, then the algorithm is actually going to favor the businesses that sell egg rolls in the downtown area even though that's further away from where the searcher is.

If she were to ask for egg rolls open now, there might be a business here and a business here and a business here that are open now, and they would be the ones that the algorithm would consider. So relevance is kicking in on the query. If she were to ask for the cheapest egg rolls, that might be here and here.

If she were to ask for the best egg rolls, that might be very, very far away, or it could be a combination of all kinds of locations. So you really need to think of proximity as a fluid thing. It's like a rubber band, and depending on... 

  • the query
  • the searcher's location
  • the relevance to the query
  • and the prominence of the business 

....is what Google is going to show in that local pack.

I hope that makes it much clearer to those of you who haven't understood the Local Algorithm. If you have some comments or suggestions, please make them below and thanks for listening.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

Google: Type Of Page Less Important Than Quality Of The Page

Google's John Mueller was asked if the site should make the meta data of its audio files indexable by Google. In which John responded "Think less about the type of pages, and more about the quality of the pages that you want to have indexed."